The Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: An Introduction

By Richard F. Staar | Go to book overview

Chapter 9 MILITARY INTEGRATION: The WTO Pact

THE ESTABLISHMENT of a multilateral military alliance system in Eastern Europe was announced by Moscow as a response to West German membership in NATO. The true reason for the Warsaw Pact which brought this system into being more probably was the desire of the U.S.S.R. to obtain legal justification for stationing its troops in East-Central Europe. The pact was initialed in the capital of Poland on May 14, 1955. One day later the Austrian state treaty was signed in Vienna, restoring sovereignty to Austria and obligating Moscow to evacuate its forces from Hungary and Romania within forty days after the latter agreement had gone into effect.1 The Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO) also provided an additional legal basis for the continued presence of Soviet troops in Poland and in the so-called German Democratic Republic, although in the latter case such provision was not at all necessary, owing to the absence of a peace treaty.

A U.S.S.R. government declaration at the height of the Hungarian revolt reaffirmed the right of this presence and added that Soviet forces in Poland had the additional justification of the Potsdam Agreement. This statement claimed that no U.S.S.R. military units existed in any other East European people's democracy--the German Democratic Republic, proclaimed "sovereign" in October 1949, apparently was not considered in this category--and that the Soviet government was ready to discuss the question of its troops abroad with other signatories to the Warsaw Pact.2

____________________
1
Boris Meissner (ed.), Der Warschauer Pakt. Dokumentensammlung ( Cologne, 1962), p. 12. A translation of the Warsaw treaty into English appears in United Nations Treaty Series, CCXIX, Part 1, p. 24. The stationing of U.S. S. R. troops in Hungary, Poland, and Romania was based until 1955 on the need to secure lines of communication with Germany.
2
Tass communique in Pravda, October 31, 1956.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.