The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History

By Scott M. Cutlip | Go to book overview

Chapter 15
John W. Hill: Builder of an Enduring Legacy

Like his fellow pioneer and longtime friend, Pendleton Dudley, John Wiley Hill was born and reared in agricultural America (the 1900 census was the nation's first to show more people employed in industry than in agriculture) and like Dudley, Hill built a successful career as a public relations counselor to corporate giants of industrial America. Unlike Dudley's agency that faded from the scene in the late 1980s, Hill's public relations firm, Hill and Knowlton, Inc., continues as one of the world's largest public relations firms. Of all the major firms started by the innovative band of men in the post World War I era, only one other still survives -- Ketchum that Public Relations, Inc., which had its genesis when Carlton and George Ketchum opened a publicity office in Pittsburgh in 1919. The brothers split in 1923, Carlton going on to build a highly successful fund-raising firm and George an equally successful advertising and public relations agency.

John Hill's career reflects the growth of public relations from an uncertain shaky publicity vocation into the large and vital field of endeavor that today employs some 150,000 persons in the United States and exerts a powerful influence on American society and on international relations. When John Hill opened what he defined at the time as a "corporate publicity office", in 1927, he rented an office for $100 a month and paid for one tenth of the time of a secretary in a joint office arrangement. In July 1980, the Hill and Knowlton firm he built was sold to the J. Walter Thompson Group for $28 million. Reflecting the growing internationalization and merger of advertising and public relations firms, the J. Walter Thompson Group was brought by the England-based WPP Group for $585 million in 1987. If he were alive, John Hill would boggle at these numbers.

-414-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 812

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.