Race, Poverty, and American Cities

By John Charles Boger; Judith Welch Wegner | Go to book overview

same time, that framework has been modified as appropriate in light of significant changes that have occurred as America's cities have become more multiethnic.

The essays that follow are arranged in six major sections:

(1) Looking Backward and Looking Ahead: Lessons and Questions from the Kerner Commission Report;

(2) An Urban Policy for America: Is Such a Framework Feasible?;

(3) Residential Mobility: Effects on Education, Employment, and Racial Integration;

(4) America's Social Policy: How Race Matters in Developing Health, Education, and Welfare Policies;

(5) The Dual Racial Reality of the Media's Message;

(6) Do We Have the Will to Change?: A Continuing Conversation between Academics and Policymakers.

Many of the essays were originally developed for publication in volume 71 of the North Carolina Law Review as part of a symposium titled "The Urban Crisis: The Kerner Commission Report Revisited." Contributors completed their essays in January 1993, and the symposium issue was printed in June 1993. Essays appearing in the present volume were edited and brought up to date as of the time of publication. Essays have been published in revised form with the consent of the authors and the editors of the North Carolina Law Review.


Notes
1.
William Butler Yeats, "The Second Coming," in Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats ( New York: Macmillan, 1956); 184-85.
2.
Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders ( New York: Bantam Books, 1968).
3.
The contributors to this volume have used the terms African American, black, and black American, often interchangeably, in their essays. The editors have elected to defer to the contributors' choices in the absence of any universally accepted racial or ethnic designation.

-xi-

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