Race, Poverty, and American Cities

By John Charles Boger; Judith Welch Wegner | Go to book overview

Contributors
John Charles Boger is associate dean for academic affairs and professor of law at. the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he teaches courses in constitutional law, race discrimination, poverty, and education law. He holds a B.A. from Duke, an M.Div. from Yale Divinity School, and a J.D. from North Carolina. From 1978 until 1990, Boger was assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., in New York City, where he headed LDF's Capital Punishment Project and, later, LDF's Poverty and Justice Project. He is presently chair of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council.
Alison Brett is a Ph.D. candidate in the Counselling Psychology Program at Northwestern University. She received her B.A. from Cornell in 1985.
John O. Calmore is professor of law and W. Joseph Ford Fellow at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, where he has taught since 1987. A graduate of Stanford and the Harvard Law School, he served as the director of litigation at the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles and as a staff attorney at the National Housing Law Project and the Western Center on Law and Poverty prior to 1987. On leave from 1990-92, Professor Calmore was a program officer in the Rights and Social Justice Program at the Ford Foundation. Professor Calmore has published numerous articles on housing issues and racial subordination. He is on the board of directors of the New World Foundation and the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, is a member of the Social Policy Advisory Committee to the Bank of America, and is a member of the Working Group of the Institute on Race and Poverty of the University of Minnesota Law School.
Peter Dreier ( Ph.D., University of Chicago) is the E. R. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics and director of the Public Policy Program at Occidental College in Los Angeles. He previously served for 9 1/2 years as the director of housing at the Boston Redevelopment Authority and senior policy advisor to Boston mayor Ray Flynn. He drafted the Community Housing Partnership Act, which became part of the federal HOME program that, since 1990, has provided federal funds to community-based nonprofit housing development organizations. The Clinton administration appointed Dreier to the advisory board of the Resolution Trust Corporation. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, the MacArthur Foundation, ACORN, VISTA, and other government, community, and philanthropic organizations. Dreier has written widely on urban politics, housing policy, and community development. He is a regular contributor to American Prospect and the Los Angeles Times, and his articles have appeared in numerous other scholarly and public policy journals. He serves on the editorial boards of Urban Affairs Quarterly, Housing Studies, and Shelterforce.

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