Man, Location, and Behavior: An Introduction to Human Geography

By Kevin R. Cox | Go to book overview

of new factories and highways in areas of high unemployment or relative poverty. What may be more important than this type of assistance, however, may be persuading the vital management and technicians to live in the grime and drab isolation of least-preferred places. Such persuasion might be afforded by some scheme of incentive payments.


CONCLUSIONS AND SUMMARY

It should be clear from this chapter, therefore, that the knowledge which we have of the world around us is often inaccurate and/or tinged with value judgments. Indeed, the knowledge which we acquire by visual and tactile contact with the environment around us is often not amenable to scientific confirmation; we call such bits of information, therefore, perceptions. Perceptions of places, moreover, are broadly divisible into two classes: there are, firstly, designative perceptions that have no evaluative content whatsoever, and there are also appraisive perceptions that contain an evaluation of the place concerned. Such perceptions are important for understanding locational patterns; man makes his locational decisions not in the world as it actually is but in the world as he perceives it.

We have designative perceptions of both the site and situation characteristics of places. A good example of designative perceptions of situational characteristics is provided by the "New Yorker's Idea of the United States." A marked feature of this map is the way in which areas closer to New York City are exaggerated in size relative to areas further away. This suggests that we tend to overestimate shorter distances relative to longer distances and, indeed, this does seem to be so. Within cities, however, perceptions of distance seem strongly affected by travel time; the latter, of course, is in turn much affected by traffic congestion and controls.

In handling the vast quantities of information which he receives about the environment around him, however, man must develop some sort of ordering system which will allow one piece of information to be related to another, permit the elimination of redundancies, and also function as a prediction device useful in searching the environment for various purposes. The ordering system which seems characteristic of man is one of a set of locational pigeonholes in which incoming bits of information can be placed.

Such locational classifications or spatial images have important locational implications. If we can put a specific place in a locational classification, for example, it will assist us in evaluating its attractiveness; such evaluation is a sine qua non in any efficiently organized search procedure, whether it is for a new residence, a place of work, or a place of play.

Appraisive perceptions, on the other hand, are particularly in evidence in so-called mental maps of residential desirability; these maps provide us with some idea of the preferences which people have for different places and, therefore, whether they are nice or repellent, attractive or unattractive, etc. Such maps have been studied for the United

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Location, and Behavior: An Introduction to Human Geography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.