Man, Location, and Behavior: An Introduction to Human Geography

By Kevin R. Cox | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Bounded Spaces: Locational Configurations and Locational Effects

INTRODUCTION

So far in this book we have considered movement over space and human decisions in a locational context insofar as they affect a variety of other locational patterns, such as the pattern of residential development within a city. Such decisions and movements, however, are executed in a locational context which is bounded either conceptually or legally. As we saw when discussing migration in Chapter Four, such boundedness can constrain movement (as with the White Australian immigration policy); it also affects the geographical coverage of the information that we have when we make locational decisions and therefore exercises a very important role in structuring geographical processes and resultant geographical patterns.

The locational significance of the boundaries which surround the spaces in which locational decisions are made is indicated very powerfully by the correlation of bounded spaces with other geographical patterns. Thus, as we shall show at greater length in this chapter, the geometry of national transportation networks tends to show a very close relationship to the surrounding national boundary, with, for example, railroad lines terminating near the boundary, running parallel to it, but rarely crossing it. Indeed, knowing whether a specific location is in one bounded space or another is a very useful predictor of the content of the space surrounded by the boundary. In general, geographical variation within bounded spaces is reduced relative to the variation between bounded spaces. In the bounded spaces that we call the nations of Europe, for example, average incomes vary much less across two areas of a given nation such as France or England (i.e., within nations) than they do between nations of the continent. The ideas of between-area variation and within-area variation are important concepts in discussions of bounded spaces and we will refer to them again below.

Such bounded spaces as nations or states or counties do not derive their sole geographical interest from their impact on other locational patterns, such as that of income, across the nations of Europe. Bounded spaces also have distinctive locational attributes of their own -- specifically shape, area, and connectivity -- and these bear important relationships to factors of an explanatory character both at a single point in time and at succeeding points in time. In particular, we shall find that the broad locational context of bounded spaces and the purposes which bounded spaces are intended to fulfill exercise an important effect on their geometries.

Finally bounded spaces are tools of the

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Location, and Behavior: An Introduction to Human Geography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.