Modernity at the Edge of Empire: State, Individual, and Nation in the Northern Peruvian Andes, 1885-1935

By David Nugent | Go to book overview

3 The Contradictions of Casta Rule

At any given point in time there were generally two main, and opposed, coalitions in existence, whose "cores" had been formed using the kinds of patriarchal marital alliance discussed in Chapter 2. 1 Each of the castas counted among its members landed families of varying degrees of prominence, past or present representatives of the central state, merchants who specialized in longdistance exchange, and "muleteer magnates" (with their peasant mule-driver clients). Along with the numerous clients among the peasantry and artisans that elite families of necessity maintained (their spheres of influence were established largely on the basis of such clienteles), these castas made up extensive, multiclass coalitions (of a noncorporate character; see Schneider, Schneider, and Hansen 1974) whose cumulative spheres of influence were scattered irregularly about the region. In terms of inter-casta struggles to control the regional space, vertical linkages between families of different social classes were therefore more important than horizontal, class-based divisions.

In the period under consideration, the two castas that struggled with one another to control the region were the Burga-Hurtado and the Pizarro-Rubio. 2 Both of these castas had emerged out of the dissolution of the Hurtado- Rodriguéz casta in the first half of the 1880s, when the contradictions inherent in casta rule (see below) asserted themselves in the context of the chaotic conditions that prevailed during this period of foreign invasion (the War of the Pacific, 1879-83) and civil war (1884-85). 3 Thereafter, the Burga-Hurtado and Pizarro-Rubio castas controlled regional affairs in alternating periods. From 1886 to I890, the Pizarro-Rubio were dominant within the region, although the Burga-Hurtado were not completely marginalized. The period

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modernity at the Edge of Empire: State, Individual, and Nation in the Northern Peruvian Andes, 1885-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction Tradition, Modernity, Nation, and State 1
  • 2 - State, Region, and Casta 23
  • 3 - The Contradictions of Casta Rule 58
  • 4 - Casta Contradictions Historicized 104
  • 5 - The Cultural Politics of Casta Rule 142
  • 6 - Modernity as Emancipation I 174
  • 7 - Modernity as Emancipation II 232
  • 8 - The Disintegration of the Casta Order 256
  • 9 - Conclusion Modernity at the Edge of Empire 308
  • Reference Matter 325
  • Notes 327
  • Bibliography 375
  • Index 395
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.