Modernity at the Edge of Empire: State, Individual, and Nation in the Northern Peruvian Andes, 1885-1935

By David Nugent | Go to book overview

5 The Cultural Politics of Casta Rule

Well-intentioned governments, like that which currently controls the destiny of the Republic, seek to gather the family that is Peru into a single body that works in concert for the progress of the country; but . . . I believe that . . . those individuals whose foreheads are marked with the stigma of general condemnation as a result of their previous history . . . could never merit a pardon for their evil ways . . . especially the nearby caudillo of abominable nature [ Pablo M. Pizarro] . . . and although I believe he would not dare to rebel against the legally constituted authorities at present . . . it is my duty to make plain the difficulties caused by [his presence].

Coronel Don José Alayza, presenta al Sr. Director del Gobierno, 1893

As has been shown in previous chapters, in the period of strength and solidarity that characterized its initial phase of control, the ruling casta used its monopoly on political positions and its control over armed force to persecute and harass members of the opposition in a systematic and comprehensive manner. In the process, the ruling casta indiscriminately violated its adversaries' constitutional rights and protections, and thus made a public mockery of the state's legitimating rhetoric of popular sovereignty.

Continuous persecution of the opposition was necessary because opposing castas refused to accept the position of the ruling group as legitimate. Rather, opposing castas saw their own claims to power as inherently more valid than the pretensions of those who controlled the prefecture, and thus constantly sought to take the place of those who ruled. Only by engaging in consistent and coordinated persecution of opposing castas could the ruling

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modernity at the Edge of Empire: State, Individual, and Nation in the Northern Peruvian Andes, 1885-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction Tradition, Modernity, Nation, and State 1
  • 2 - State, Region, and Casta 23
  • 3 - The Contradictions of Casta Rule 58
  • 4 - Casta Contradictions Historicized 104
  • 5 - The Cultural Politics of Casta Rule 142
  • 6 - Modernity as Emancipation I 174
  • 7 - Modernity as Emancipation II 232
  • 8 - The Disintegration of the Casta Order 256
  • 9 - Conclusion Modernity at the Edge of Empire 308
  • Reference Matter 325
  • Notes 327
  • Bibliography 375
  • Index 395
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.