Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture

By Michael Moffatt | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Thanks, first of all, to the hundred and eighty Rutgers students who allowed me to live among them over the years on "Gates Third," "Erewhon Third," and "Hasbrouck Fourth." Special thanks to my roommates (real first names only): Rich and Mike and Chris and Hank and (another) Chris. Not to mention, slightly farther afield, Sue and Sally and Venita and Lisa and Beth and Renata and Julie and Jeannie and Estelle and Jill and Shelley and Katrina; Mike and Spanky and Lee and T. J. and Greg and A. J. and Jeff and David and Joe and Scott and Kenny and Stan and John and Bill and Alex and Howdy and Kelvin and ("you look maahvelous") Mike and Lou. And who could ever forget Dapper?

My collective gratitude to the thousand or more students who wrote self-reports for me, or who commented on earlier drafts of these essays. My specific thanks to Louis Miller 1987, William Brahms 1989, Christine Brandel 1986, and Anne Devine 1988 for the materials in figure 1, map 2, map 3, and map 4, respectively.

I am particularly grateful to Susan Gal for her anthropological and linguistic insights and her good friendship during the entire decade of this research. Janet Baldares gave me an equally incisive long-term commentary and the support of a loved one and a family member. Andrew Abbott, D. Randall Smith, Karen Predow, Sarane Boocock, Robert Gutman, Benjamin Zablocki, Anne Foner, and Ann Parelius of the late lamented Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rutgers College encouraged and advised me in my early years on Gates Third and Erewhon Third-- and Abbott and Smith have gone on being my sociological gurus throughout. George Kearns and Cleo McNelly in the Department of English were also early friends of this project.

More recently, I am very grateful to many members of the splendid Department of History at Rutgers University. John Gillis introduced me to the social history of youth and gave me valued friendship and much supportive encouragement over the years. Richard P. McCormick kindly introduced me to the pleasures and mysteries of local historical research using primary sources. Judith Walkowitz did excellent readings of chapters 5 and 6. David Oshinsky thought up my title and did me other kindnesses. (Thanks also to Margaret Mead, her reputation bloodied but still unbowed after the attacks of pygmies, for her original title, which inspired

-xi-

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Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • One / Orientation 1
  • Further Comments 20
  • Two / "What College is Really Like" 25
  • Further Comments 62
  • Three / a Year on Hasbrouck Fourth 71
  • Further Comments 125
  • Four / Race and Individualism 141
  • Further Comments 168
  • Five / Sex 181
  • Further Comments 231
  • Six / Sex in College 247
  • Further Comments 266
  • Seven / the Life of the Mind 271
  • Further Comments 310
  • Appendix One on Method 327
  • Appendix Two on Typicality 331
  • Further Comments 336
  • References Cited 341
  • Index 347
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