CHAPTER XIII
Death of Sir Robert Peel

THE ABOLITION OF TRANSPORTATION

AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR 1850 the detective police found themselves faced with a new form of crime. Chloroform had recently come into prominence as an anesthetic, and there was an epidemic of robberies in consequence. On the 10th of January two notorious women used it to render a Mr. Jewett, a solicitor in the Whitechapel Road, unconscious. He woke to find himself stripped of his clothing and valuables, lying on a filthy bed in a wretched lodging. His health suffered severely in consequence. He recovered sufficiently to be able to identify his assailants, who were sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

On June 29 Sir Robert Peel, the founder of the Metropolitan Police, sustained a fatal accident on his return from an audience with the Queen at Buckingham Palace. On his way up Constitution Hill the horse he was riding threw him, and he fell sideways on his left shoulder. He was sixty-two. Two gentlemen who saw the accident raised him to a sitting posture, and Dr. Foucart, who happened to be passing, asked him whether he was much hurt. "Yes," he said, "I am very much hurt," and then he lapsed into unconsciousness. He was taken home in a carriage. Sir James Clarke, the Queen's physician, met the carriage and got in beside him. When they arrived at his house in Whitehall Gardens, he was conscious. He said that he felt very

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