Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview
plete block lasts? (Was it "b..oy" at first, and "b........oy" now?)
12. When the complete blocks first appeared, upon what sounds or words were they noticed?
13. Did the child force when the complete blocks were first experienced or was there a mere holding of the posture until release came?
14. Did the amount of forcing increase as time passed?
15. Did it seem to be localized in any particular part of the speech organs, at first: lips, tongue, jaws, throat, chest, entire body?
16. Did there seem to be any spreading of the forcing from one of the above speech organs to others? Explain.
17. Did the stutterer ever force on the repetitions of sound or syllable?
18. If the stutterer has any facial spasms or grimaces, give approximate date of their first occurrence, and describe their nature (how they look, what he does, etc.). Can you account for their appearance? Explain what you think caused them.

References
1. American Association of Social Workers, "Interviews," Studies in Practice of Social Work, 1931, No. 1.

This study considers the place of the interview in case work, involving both psychological and sociological techniques. Types of interviews are discussed, and an outline for recording and analysis is given. Examples of both narrative and dialogue forms of interviews are given.

2. Hanks L. M., "Prediction from Case Material to Personality Test Data," Archives of Psychology, 1936, Vol. 29, No. 207. This author shows the reliability of the interview.
3. Kanner L., and Lachman S. E., "The Contribution of Physical Illness to the Development of Behavior Disorders in Children," Mental Hygiene, 1934, Vol. 17, pages 605-617.

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Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
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