Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

8
Special Tests and Examination Methods

In addition to the case history examination described in the preceding chapter, certain special examinations must frequently be used. Some of these can be performed by the professional associates of the speech-correction teacher, but, since very often these persons are not available when most needed, the speech-correction teacher should have sufficient skill to administer the tests efficiently. Among these special tests are those of intelligence, personality, auditory acuity, auditory memory span, pitch discrimination and performance, laterality, educational achievement, breathing, and muscular coördination. The speech correctionist should have a knowledge of the limitations of each test and should be able to apply the test results to diagnosis and therapy. Since most of these special tests are described adequately elsewhere, we shall confine our discussion primarily to their nature and uses in speech correction.

Intelligence tests. The part played by low intelligence in producing articulatory and voice disorders is well known. Not only are children of low intelligence slow to learn to talk, but their speech patterns are frequently slurred, confused with sound substitutions, and complicated by peculiar intonations. Motor skills are retarded, and speech, the most complicated of all motor, skills, certainly demonstrates the effect of this retardation. The feeble-minded child's lack of discrimination, his distractibility, and his lack of

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Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
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