Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

SPECIAL TEST FORM (Continued)
Phonograph record: Examiner's observations:
Reading: Test used: Achievement
test results:
Examiner's report:
Pitch discrimination and performance:
Whistle:
Voice:
Following with pencil:
Auditory memory span:
Motor coördination:
Personality Test results: Test given:
Autobiographical data: Summarize: (1) the important dif-
ferences mentioned by speech defective or associates, (2) the
penalties or excess approvals which contributed to the develop-
ment of personality, and (3) the speech-defective's reactions to
those penalties or approvals.

References

Intelligence, Personality, and Achievement Tests
1. Greene H. N., and Jorgensen A. N., Use and Interpretation of Educational Measurements, New York, Longmans, Green and Co., 1929.
2. Monroe M., Children Who Cannot Read, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1932.
3. Murchison C. (Editor), Foundations of Experimental Psychology, pages 661-737, Worcester, Clark University Press, 1930.
4. Symonds P., Diagnosing Personality and Conduct, New York, D. Appleton-Century Co., 1934.
5. Travis L. E., Speech Pathology, Chapter 4, New York, D. Appleton-Century Co., 1931.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 436

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.