Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

Speech Tests

Although the case history gives us much information about the causes and development of a speech disorder, it tells us little of what we need to know about the actual symptoms. To discover these, we use systematic methods of speech analysis. As we have previously implied, it is seldom sufficient in speech correction to discover and remove the original causes of the disorder. Frequently they no longer exist at the time the patient applies for treatment, but they have lasted long enough to set up bad speech habits which can perpetuate themselves. As we have said, speech correction is reeducation, and therefore implies error- analysis, the tearing down of defective speech habits, the substitution of correct speech habits, the removal of etiological factors, and the formation of adequate reactions to speech situations. This chapter deals with methods for making such speech analyses. It is divided into sections for each of the four major types of speech disorders.


Articulation Tests

Articulatory disorders, as we have defined them, are characterized by errors of sound substitution, addition, omission, and distortion. Each speech correctionist devises his own procedure for giving the articulatory examination. Even when students have been trained according to one standard technique, they find it necessary to make modifications to fit the individuality of each case they examine. For

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Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
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