Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

12
The Treatment of Voice Disorders

Voice disorders account for only approximately ten or fifteen percent of the speech correctionist's cases, but they are frequently the most difficult of all problems. The reasons for this difficulty are, no doubt, the lack of research, the complexity of the problem, and the fact that such cases have usually been treated by elocution and singing teachers rather than by members of the medical or speech-correction professions. The literature is very scanty and very scattered. Except for certain occupations such as the ministry, teaching, and entertaining, the average voice defect is not a handicap, since communication is still possible, a factor which does not hold true in stuttering or articulatory difficulties.

As we have said, there are almost as many names for voice disorders as there are adjectives to describe the voice, but in general they may be classified as disorders of pitch, intensity, and voice quality. Frequently any one case will be defective in more than one of these aspects, but for clearness of presentation we shall consider them according to the above classification.

Need for medical coöperation in diagnosis. Many of the voice disorders are medical problems, and the speech correctionist must always keep this in mind. Much harm can be done by administering vocal training to a case whose disorder is due to active pathology or organic abnormalities.

-269-

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Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
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