Daily Life in Victorian England

By Sally Mitchell | Go to book overview

11
Faith and Works: Religion and Reform

RELIGIOUS FAITH

In popular imagination, Victorians were regular and complacent churchgoers. Although this statement does describe some Victorians, nineteenth-century religious life was more likely to be filled with energy, turmoil, and struggles against doubt. A national count on Sunday, March 30, 1851, showed that 60 percent of the people who were physically able to do so attended church services.

The vast majority of England's residents professed some variety of Protestant Christianity. The Church of England--called also the "Anglican communion," and closely related to the Episcopalian church in the United States--was the established church. The sovereign was its head; Parliament had final authority in matters of doctrine; all property owners paid a small tax to keep up the parish church. In the villages and small towns where traditional ways of life were strongest, the Church of England served both gentry and laborers. Church attendance was much higher in the countryside than in industrial areas.

Protestants of other denominations--primarily Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Unitarians, and Quakers--were known as "Dissenters" or "Nonconformists." (In literal terms, this means they did not assent to the Thirty-Nine Articles of Faith that formalized England's separation from the Church of Rome in 1562.) Nonconformity was strongest in towns and cities, and especially among the rising technical and business classes. Of the people who attended services on March

-239-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daily Life in Victorian England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Chronology: Chief Events of the Victorian Age in England ix
  • Introduction: The Victorians and Their World xiii
  • 1 - A Brief History of Victorian England 1
  • 2 - The Foundations of Daily Life 17
  • 3 - Working Life 41
  • 4 - Technology, Science, and the Urban World 71
  • 5 - Official Life 87
  • 7 - Family and Social Rituals 141
  • 8 - Education 165
  • 9 - Health and Medicine 189
  • 10 - Leisure and Pleasure 209
  • 11 - Faith and Works 239
  • 12 - Victorian Morality 259
  • 13 - England and Empire 273
  • Glossary 293
  • For Further Reading 299
  • Index 303
  • About the Author 313
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.