Notes
1)
See Maurice Lebel, ed., Josse Bade, Dit Badius (1462-1535); and for greater detail and wider scope, Renaudet, Préréforme et Humanisme. Phillips has remarked on Erasmus' consideration of audience in his prefaces: 'In many of these prefaces we see the enthusiasm for the work of restoration [of texts and of antiquity] linked continually with hopes for the young, with the vision of a new age. "What riches, if only one could be a boy again, O divitias, si liceat repubescere!"' 'Erasmus and the Classics' in Erasmus, ed. Dorey ( London, 1970) 17, q. from Epistle 643 of 1517 ( Allen III, 65/27).
2)
There was to be sure an overlap of manuscript and print: see the invaluable testimony of Bade in his 225 and more prefaces, and the recent studies (cited above) by Trapp, Hellinga, et al.
3)
See CWE 2:75/9 for an estimation of the value of these coins (and Allen I, 395/51 n., introd. note to Ep. 181).
4)
See CWE 2:n. to Epistle 185. It is noteworthy that Erasmus here writes to Servatius Rogers, now his prior at Steyn -- probably at the end of 1505 -- informing him that he has been staying with Mountjoy in London for several months, and he signs the letter 'from the bishop's palace': scarcely a letter intended to endear himself to his prior (although he does begin with the excuse of missing letters), but calculated to impress with the fact of being under the roof of the bishop.
5)
Allen thinks it more probable that 'it may be supposed that Caesar [Keyzere] obtained the Concio [ 1511] and the poems from Erasmus in Paris, with which he then had connexions, in the summer of 1511, and that in reprinting them he added, though unconnected, a letter written to himself some years before, which he had doubtless treasured' (1, 388 n.).
6)
Allen dated the letter 27 November 1503 ( I, 393), but CWE dates it 27 September ( CWE 2:75). It clearly follows the letter to Ruistre, which is 17 November 1503, and no reason is provided in CWE for its changed dating.
7)
See Epistle 185/1-2, 'a letter which will, I think, have been delivered to you'; and Epistle 189/1-2, 'I have sent you several letters already ...'
8)
Given that some letters were lost even in 1504-5, is it not likely that Erasmus would not have wanted to keep a letter from Servatius explicitly directing him to return to his monastry?
9)
The first letter in their extensive correspondence is Epistle 184. See CWE 2:97-8 n., and Allen I, 413 n.; also BR.
10)
In a striking way the friendship of Erasmus and Gillis -- of each with the other, and of both with More -- is celebrated in the diptych by Metsys (see chapter 33 and figures 1 and 2). Gillis helped Erasmus greatly in negotiations with printers, and in financial matters ( BR).
11)
See Trinkaus in BR and Chomarat, Grammaire et Rhetorique, 11, 777 ff.
12)
E. J. Kenney, The Classical Text, 25 ff: the traditional view by 16th c editors of the editorial task 'was to improve the texts by correction: emendare, corrigere, emaculare'. Collation has two related significations: a critical examination of mss or editions with a view to ascertaining the correct or better text; and the recorded result of such comparison, various readings obtained by comparing different exemplars.
13)
Louis Bouyer in Cambridge History of the Bible, 11, 495.

-49-

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Erasmus of Europe: - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes xiv
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • List of ILlustrations xvii
  • 18 Return from England: the Years in Flanders and Paris, 1501-1502 1
  • 19 the Early Louvain Years, 1502-1504 14
  • Notes 24
  • 20 the Enchiridion: 'Philosophia Christi' 28
  • Notes 40
  • 21 1504, a Threshold Year 41
  • Notes 49
  • 22 Return to England, 1505-1506 51
  • Notes 59
  • 23 Italy, 1506-1509 62
  • Notes 71
  • 24 the Adages 74
  • Notes 82
  • 25 England Again, 1509: the 'Period of Silence' 86
  • Notes 92
  • 25 the Praise of Folly 95
  • Notes 105
  • 27 the Cambridge Years, 1511-1514 109
  • Notes 122
  • 28 the Changing World in 1514 126
  • 29 Vocation and Life-Style 140
  • Notes 147
  • 30 to Basel, Summer 1514 149
  • Notes 161
  • 31 1516, the Annus Mirabilis 165
  • Notes 173
  • 32 the New Testament: A Life Work 175
  • Notes 189
  • Notes 210
  • 34 the Rising Storm of Controversy: Erasmus and His Catholic Critics, 1517-1522 216
  • Notes 231
  • 35 the Colloquies 236
  • Notes 243
  • Erasmus and His Friends: His Audience and His Geography 247
  • Notes 259
  • 37 Reform and Reformation: Ecclesia Semper Reformanda 263
  • Notes 278
  • 38 the Basel Years, 1521-1529: the Reformation Storm Rising 283
  • 39 Erasmus and Luther: on the Freedom of the Will 298
  • Notes 306
  • 40 Language and Style 310
  • Notes 317
  • 41 the Basel Years: Humanism and Religion 320
  • Notes 333
  • 42 the Freiburg Years, 1529-1535 337
  • Notes 346
  • 43 the Final Act at Basel: Summer 1535 to July 1536 350
  • Notes 359
  • 44 the Achievement of Erasmus and His Place in History 362
  • Notes 377
  • Appendix C Erasmus' Dispensations 381
  • Notes 383
  • Appendix D Erasmus' Wills 384
  • Notes 385
  • Appendix E Portraits of Erasmus 387
  • An Erasmian Chronology: LIfe and Writings 390
  • Bibliography 393
  • Index of Names of Persons 408
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