Notes
1)
The annuity granted by the emperor continued, though Erasmus did not regularly receive the moneys, partly because of the disorder of imperial finances, partly because the agent Pierre Barbier was untrustworthy. In letters of July 1529 (Ep. 2192 to Fugger, Allen VIII, 225/96) and August 1534 (Ep. 2961 to Justus Decius, Allen XI, 30 ff.) Erasmus complained that his pension had been seven years unpaid, and that Barbier had once robbed him of one hundred florins: 'Adhuc verbis amicus est, sed in pecuniaria re perfidissimus' ( Allen XI, 32/55-6).
2)
There were half a dozen editions of this late work during Erasmus' final months, and there have been many more, with translations into French, Spanish, Czech, Dutch, German and English.
3)
See Smith 259 & nn. 2 & 3 on funds from England.
4)
Preserved Smith has written on Erasmus' role in the divorce business: "'German Opinion of the Divorce of Henry VIII'", EHR ( 1912) 671 ff. It is interesting to note that Catherine was impressed by Erasmus' De Libero Arbitrio (Ep. 1513) and read his De praeparatione ad mortem only a few months before her own death (Ep. 3090); BR.
5)
The problem of Henry's divorce did not go away, and Thomas More was ineluctably caught in its meshes; but Erasmus' silence apparently was construed by some to mean he approved of it. In 1533, writing to Damian a Goes from Freiburg (Ep. 2846), he mentioned a visit two years earlier by two members of the emperor's court who had asked for his views on the case; and there is reason to believe that he had been approached by an envoy interested from the point of view of Henry ( Allen X, 271). To the emperor's courtiers Erasmus answered that he had not given his attention to this question -- an equivocation -- and he went on to say that it would be very easy to pronounce what she would like, but to declaim on what the divine or human law might permit would require not only a lengthy study but also a knowledge of the circumstances of the case (Allen X, 273/73-6).
6)
See August Rüegg, Die beiden Blütezeiten des Basler Humanismus ( Basel, 1960), esp. I. Teil, "'Der Humanismus im Renaissancezeitalter und die Gründung der Basler Universität'". Among the several studies of Guido Kisch that bear on Basel and its university, one should cite Erasmus und die Jurisprudenz seiner Zeit ( Basel, 1960).
7)
Thus Bietenholz in BR, who adds valuable information on Erasmus' seeking theological advice of Baer, and Baer's careful examinations of Erasmus' positions on key questions. Baer, Bietenholz further notes, attempted to mediate in Erasmus' conflicts with Hutten, Eppendorf, and Pelargus'.
8)
See H. Meylan, "'Erasme et Pellican'", in Colloquium Erasmianum ( Mons, 1968) 244-54.
9)
Two areas of his scholarship merit special attention, geography and music. Glareanus published a map of the world in 1510, which presents the eastern coastline of America with considerable accuracy, and in 1527 he published his De geographica, a scientific description of Asia, Africa, and Europe; see my monograph on The Geography of Erasmus (forthcoming). It is in the field of music that he won a permanent reputation, and his Dodecachordon ( 1547, but written between 1519 and 1533) offers a harmonis-

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Erasmus of Europe: - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes xiv
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • List of ILlustrations xvii
  • 18 Return from England: the Years in Flanders and Paris, 1501-1502 1
  • 19 the Early Louvain Years, 1502-1504 14
  • Notes 24
  • 20 the Enchiridion: 'Philosophia Christi' 28
  • Notes 40
  • 21 1504, a Threshold Year 41
  • Notes 49
  • 22 Return to England, 1505-1506 51
  • Notes 59
  • 23 Italy, 1506-1509 62
  • Notes 71
  • 24 the Adages 74
  • Notes 82
  • 25 England Again, 1509: the 'Period of Silence' 86
  • Notes 92
  • 25 the Praise of Folly 95
  • Notes 105
  • 27 the Cambridge Years, 1511-1514 109
  • Notes 122
  • 28 the Changing World in 1514 126
  • 29 Vocation and Life-Style 140
  • Notes 147
  • 30 to Basel, Summer 1514 149
  • Notes 161
  • 31 1516, the Annus Mirabilis 165
  • Notes 173
  • 32 the New Testament: A Life Work 175
  • Notes 189
  • Notes 210
  • 34 the Rising Storm of Controversy: Erasmus and His Catholic Critics, 1517-1522 216
  • Notes 231
  • 35 the Colloquies 236
  • Notes 243
  • Erasmus and His Friends: His Audience and His Geography 247
  • Notes 259
  • 37 Reform and Reformation: Ecclesia Semper Reformanda 263
  • Notes 278
  • 38 the Basel Years, 1521-1529: the Reformation Storm Rising 283
  • 39 Erasmus and Luther: on the Freedom of the Will 298
  • Notes 306
  • 40 Language and Style 310
  • Notes 317
  • 41 the Basel Years: Humanism and Religion 320
  • Notes 333
  • 42 the Freiburg Years, 1529-1535 337
  • Notes 346
  • 43 the Final Act at Basel: Summer 1535 to July 1536 350
  • Notes 359
  • 44 the Achievement of Erasmus and His Place in History 362
  • Notes 377
  • Appendix C Erasmus' Dispensations 381
  • Notes 383
  • Appendix D Erasmus' Wills 384
  • Notes 385
  • Appendix E Portraits of Erasmus 387
  • An Erasmian Chronology: LIfe and Writings 390
  • Bibliography 393
  • Index of Names of Persons 408
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