Ethnic Groups and Marital Choices: Ethnic History and Marital Assimilation in Canada, 1871 and 1971

By Madeline A. Richard | Go to book overview

Appendices

A: VARIABLES AND VARIABLE DEFINITIONS

Variables
The 1871 and 1971 censuses provide data for six and nine ethnic origin groups, respectively, and these furnish the basis for distinguishing between ethnic endogamy and ethnic exogamy in this analysis. Similarly, data for religious denominations are used to determine religious intra- and intermarriage. These two variables are used in combination to derive an index of marital assimilation. The analysis focuses on only the four provinces in the Dominion in 1871 and all of the provinces for which data are provided in the 1971 Public Use Sample. 1 The decision to consider all available provincial data for 1971, rather than the four provinces that comprised Canada in 1871, was taken in order to generalize to the entire 'Canadian' population in each century and to maximize the Ns for each ethnic group.The specific variables employed in this analysis and their definitions are as follows, as given in the Dictionary of the 1971 Census Terms ( Statistics Canada 1972), Historical Statistics of Canada ( Urquhart and Buckley 1965; Leacy 1983), the 1871 Census volumes, and the Canadian Historical Mobility Project:
1. Ethnic origin: In 1871 ethnic origin referred to racial origin and was a mixture of biological, cultural, and geographic attributes. In 1971 it referred to the ethnic or cultural background traced through the father's side.
2. Religion: refers to the specific religious body, denomination, sect, or community of which the individual is a member or which the person adheres to or favours in both 1871 and 1971. The specific question asked in 1971 was, 'What is your religion?'
3. Nativity: refers to whether a person was born in or outside Canada, i.e.,

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Ethnic Groups and Marital Choices: Ethnic History and Marital Assimilation in Canada, 1871 and 1971
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 3
  • Chapter Two - the Relationship Between Intermarriage and Assimilation: Patterns, Correlates, and Determinants 16
  • Summary 38
  • Chapter Three - Canada's Immigrants: Patterns of Immigration and Ethnic Settlement 40
  • Chapter Four - Canada's Ethnic Populations 76
  • Summary 103
  • Chapter Five - Prevalence and Patterns of Intermarriage in Canada, 1871 and 1971 106
  • Summary 123
  • Chapter Six - Group and Individual Factors 126
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusion 145
  • Conclusions 152
  • Appendices 157
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 169
  • Name Index 181
  • Subject Index 185
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