Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

Preface

This is the first general history of Asian-American education. During the 1960s and 1970s, when I edited Integrated Education magazine, standard educational journals were almost entirely ignoring the rising numbers of Asian-American children. Integrated Education took it on itself to publish more articles on the subject than all other educational journals combined. Early in the 1970s, I proposed to write a two-volume history of the education of minorities in the United States, including a chapter each on Chinese Americans and Japanese Americans. No funding agency cared to finance such a large work. Finally, the Field Foundation agreed to facilitate the writing of a single volume, which required the halving of the coverage. The Asian-American material was dropped, along with a number of other significant topics. Meanwhile, I continued to include Asian-American materials in various book-length bibliographies I compiled in the past 20 years. The present work is far more comprehensive than anything I could have written in the mid-1970s about Asian-Americans. Yet, it is not meant as a final word. The time is much too soon for that.

I wish to thank the librarians at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; the California State University, Long Beach; and the University of Chicago for their unstinting help. Not any less, I am grateful to the people who operate the indispensable Inter-Library Loan System for the thoroughness and dispatch with which they responded to my cascading requests for hard-to-obtain books. Mealedey Seng and Ken Cheng, my research assistants at CSULB during 1992 to 1994, carried loads of books and reports and duplicated numerous journal articles as well as transported gallons of coffee for me. As the initial occupant of

-ix-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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