Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

As we saw earlier, during the years of Japanese annexation ( 1910-1945), prejudice and discrimination were the hallmarks of the colonial system. There were no efforts to disguise the Japanese-designed dual school system as anything other than what it plainly was. Education, employment, and the administration of justice were all purveyed in a discriminatory manner. The hurt of it was only magnified by the contempt with which the Japanese inflicted it.

For centuries, the Cholla province has been what Choi called " Korea's most exploited and marginalized region."134 Buruma characterized Cholla as "a region that is full of resentment over job discrimination and economic deprivation" and described Cholla people as having "a reputation for being sly, quarrelsome, untrustworthy; the big corporations are still loath to hire people from Cholla, and most parents from Kyongsang won't let their sons and daughters marry Cholla people." 135 Choi added that the Cholla dialect has long been a stigma that signified a speaker's debased status. 136

It would seem that acquaintance with these historical experiences would readily afford Korean immigrants a sound and definite basis for understanding the American dimensions of prejudice and discrimination.


NOTES
1
William Shaw, ed., Human Rights in Korea. Historical and Policy Perspectives ( Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1991), p. 32.
2
Carter J. Eckert and others, Korea Old and New. A History (Ilchokak, 1990), p. 121. See also Hyong In Kim, Rural Slavery in Antebellum South Carolina and Early Choson Korea (Doctoral dissertation, University of New Mexico, 1990).
3
See Choi Kum-suk, "Rise in the Legal Rights of Korean Women," Koreana, 4, No. 2 ( 1989), pp. 13-23; Soon Man Rhin, "The Status of Women in Traditional Korean Society," pp. 11-37 in Harold Hakwon Sunoo and Dong Soo Kim, eds., Korean Women in a Struggle for Humanization (Korean Christian Scholars, Association of Korean Christian Scholars in North America, Spring, 1978); and Park Sun-young, "Confucianism Molds Core of the System," Koreana, 5, No. 2 ( 1991), p. 21.
4
Eckert, Korea Old and New, p. 193.
7
Lee Won-ho, "Modern [Educational] System Came Hard Way to Korea," Koreana, 5, No. 2 ( 1991), p. 28.
8
Andrew J. Grajdanzev, Modern Korea ( Institute of Pacific Relations, 1944), p. 45.
10
Bruce Cumings, The Two Koreas ( Foreign Policy Association, May-June 1984), p. 24.
11
Mitsuhiko Kimura, "Standards of Living in Colonial Korea: Did the Masses Become Worse Off or Better Off Under Japanese Rule?" Journal of Economic History, 53 ( September 1993), pp. 629-652.
12
Wanmo Dong, Japanese Colonial Policy and Practices in Korea, 1905-1945: A Study in Assimilation (Doctoral dissertation, Georgetown University, 1965), p. 385.
14
David Brudnoy, "Japan's Experiment in Korea," Monumenta Nipponica, 25 ( 1970), p. 187.

-92-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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