Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

Nevertheless, despite the continuing loss of experienced middle managers, the Hong Kong economy seemed able to replace them. As Overholt, a close observer of Hong Kong affairs, observed, "High-level skills are flowing into Hong Kong to a greater degree than they are flowing out."134

American educational institutions do not ordinarily keep records of children from Hong Kong (or Taiwan) separately from those from China. Therefore, it is not possible to trace systematically their educational experiences.


NOTES
1
G. B. Endacott, A History of Hong Kong ( Oxford University Press, 1958), p. 3.
2
Henry Lethbridge, Hong Kong: Stability and Change ( Oxford University Press, 1978), p. 135.
4
Jung-Fang Tsai, Hong Kong in Chinese History. Community and Social Unrest in the British Colony, 1842-1913 ( Columbia University Press, 1993).
5
Bernard Hung-Kay Luk, "Chinese Culture in the Hong Kong Curriculum: Heritage and Colonialism,''" Comparative Education Review, 35 ( November 1991), p. 661.
6
Lethbridge, Hong Kong: Stability and Change, p. 5.
7
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 70.
10
Lethbridge, Hong Kong: Stability and Change, p. 167.
12
Judith Agassi, "Social Structure and Social Stratification in Hong Kong," p. 79 in Ian Jarrie and Joseph Agassi, eds., Hong Kong: A Society in Transition ( Praeger, 1968).
13
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 245.
14
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 295.
15
Judith Agassi, "Social Structure and Social Stratification in Hong Kong," p. 74.
16
See Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 143; and Ng Lun Ngai-ha, Interactions of East and West. Development of Public Education in Early Hong Kong ( The Chinese University Press, 1984), p. 157. The relative percentages are 13.6 and 3.7.
17
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 171.
20
Ngai-ha, Interactions of East and West, pp. 51-52.
23
Anthony Sweeting, Education in Hong Kong Pre-1841 to 1941: Fact and Opinion. Materials for a History of Education in Hong Kong ( Hong Kong University Press, 1990), p. 43.
24
Ngai-ha, Interactions of East and West, p. 67.
25
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 250.
26
Ngai-ha, Interactions of East and West, p. 13.
27
Grace C. L. Mak, "The Schooling of Girls in Hong Kong: Progress and Contradictions in the Transition," p. 168 in Gerard A. Postiglione, ed., Education and Society in Hong Kong. Toward One Country and Two Systems ( Sharpe, 1991).
28
Sweeting, Education in Hong Kong, p. 222.
29
Endacott, A History of Hong Kong, p. 240.
30
Mak, "The Schooling of Girls in Hong Kong," p. 168.

-221-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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