Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
Taiwan

The last dynasty of China conquered Taiwan and for several hundred years, it was a valued colony. As a result of the Sino-Japanese War of 1894 and 1895, Japan took possession of Taiwan in 1895 and held it under the name Formosa for the next 50 years. Together with Korea in 1910 and Manchuria during the 1930s, these three colonies were the core of the Japanese Empire until 1945. To an unusual degree, the colonies were more integrated into the overall economic design of Japan itself. For the Japanese, their colonies carried a larger burden of production than was the case with European colonies. This extended even to industrial output, a realm usually considered off-limits in other colonies. A broad range of products and materials lacking in the home country was to be provided by the colonies. As Aseniero observed, "Japanese colonialism, rapacious as it was like any other, was not interested in Korea and Taiwan merely for pillage and extraction of value."1

Taiwanese were not entrusted with significant governmental authority. A small number became higher civil bureaucrats. 2 Many more were employed as heads of townships; few could be found as district counselors, a step above township heads. Both township heads and district counselors received economic privileges from the Japanese. 3 Although many Taiwanese passed the requisite civil service examinations, they did not receive appointments to which they were entitled. 4 Wealthy Taiwanese who collaborated with the colonial government were rewarded with lucrative opportunities and extraordinary wealth as well as occasional governing responsibilities. Thus, "in 1937, seven years after the number of Taiwanese councilors had been increased from 9 to 14, all Tai-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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