Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

States told me that the United States is a paradise for children because of light homework, the absence of physical punishment in school, and easy entrance into college.''83 To children of workers and small businessmen, however, the prospects are less than paradisiacal. Their parents often know little English and their working hours keep them apart from their children. Especially for older children, school progress is grinding, 84 Class factors play a large role among the Taiwanese immigrants. 85


CONCLUDING REMARKS

The educational histories of Hong Kong and Taiwan underscore the deleterious effect of colonialism. Although in both cases the imperialist power introduced modern schooling, it was presented as a privilege for a chosen few and as a near- charade for the many. The resulting system produced highly unequal results. Advanced schooling was a taunt rather than an opportunity.

A free, compulsory, common-school system did not yet exist in Britain when Hong Kong became a colony, nor in Japan when Taiwan was first colonized. At no time before 1945 were educational opportunities in Hong Kong or Taiwan anywhere near what they were in Britain or Japan. That one or the other of the colonies was more extensively schooled at any given time was due to varying needs of the colonizing power. As was pointed out earlier, the Japanese integrated Taiwan much more into its home affairs than did Britain with Hong Kong. To that extent, schooling served as an imperial imperative, especially in Taiwan. Throughout the 19th century, on the other hand, mass schooling in Hong Kong was neither an economic or a strategic imperative.


NOTES
1
George Aseniero, "South Korea and Taiwanese Development. The Transnational Context," Review, 17 (Summer 1994), p. 287.
2
Ching-Chih Chen, "Impact of Japanese Colonial Rule on Taiwanese Elites," Journal of,4sian History, 22 ( 1988), p. 25.
7
Hill Gates, Chinese Working-Class Lives. Getting By in Taiwan ( Cornell University Press, 1987), p. 42.
8
E. Patricia Tsurumi, Japanese Colonial Education in Taiwan, 1895--1945 ( Harvard University Press, 1977), p. 231.
9
Gates, Chinese Working-Class Lives, p. 32.
10
Wen-hsiung Hsu, "Anti-Japanese Colonialism in Taiwan, 1907-1916," Chinese Studies in History, 25 (Spring 1991), p. 76.

-237-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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