Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

Hawaii. Why any kind of schooling was provided was, from the government's view, a matter of pacification rather than religion or educational principle. It was hoped by U.S. officials that the schools might convince Indians not to oppose their own banishment across the Mississippi. 161

Americans were not free to duplicate their home-grown practices overseas. Sometimes, geography stood in the way. In Samoa, the port of Pago-Pago was the main attraction. Americans, however, did not confiscate significant amounts of Samoan land and thus left the system of common ownership undisturbed. This was not because of U.S. respect for the principle of common ownership but simply because there was not much productive soil available. In Hawaii, on the other hand, much land was available and could be put to productive use promptly by the Americans. Within a few years, in fact, the traditional Hawaiian system of land ownership was legislated out of existence and by the 1890s, as we saw earlier, Americans owned most Hawaiian land. A great attraction of Guam to Americans was the presence there of comparatively much level cultivable land. Land whose location was valuable militarily was taken without a second thought.


NOTES
1
Elizabeth K. Anttila, "A History of Education in American Samoa and Guam" (Master's thesis, University of Texas, 1953), p. 30.
2
Thom Huebner, "Language and Schooling in Western and American Samoa," World Englishes, 8 ( 1989), p. 63.
3
Edwin R. Embree, A New School in American Samoa ( Julius Rosenwald Fund, 1932), pp. 8-9.
4
Governor S. V. Graham to Mrs. Helen Wilson, quoted in Pedro Cruz Sanchez, Education in American Samoa (Doctoral dissertation, Stanford University, 1955), p. 103. See also Felix M. Keesing , Modern Samoa. Its Government and Changing Life ( George Allen and Unwin, 1934), p. 430.
5
Statement of September 14, 1922; quoted in American Samoa, Naval Governor, 1910-1913 ( Government Printing Office, 1927), p. 81.
10
U.S. American Samoan Commission, American Samoa. Hearings ( Government Printing Office, 1931), p. 52.
14
See, for example, ibid., p. 467.
15
Annual Report. Governor of American Samoa to the Secretary of the Interior for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1953, pp. 24, 131.
16
Annual Report. Governor of American Samoa to the Secretary of the Interior for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1961, p. 67.
17
Annual Report. Governor of American Samoa to the Secretary of the Interior for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965, p. 12.

-281-

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Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
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