South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE PRESENT VOLUME represents a reduction of my three-volume History of South Carolina published in 1934. The numerous citations of sources in the original edition are here generally omitted, as anyone can readily find the authority for most points by reference to the larger work. All dates within the period during which English speaking people sometimes used "old style" or "new style," frequently to the confusion of later generations, are here given "new style" as to the year, but with the day of the month as originally written.

May we not hope that the time has arrived when the distance from ancient passionate crises and the maturity of our intellectual life make it possible for South Carolinians to study their past with intellectual frankness? And may not outsiders be sufficiently free from the bitterness of former conflicts to wish to know more truly the character and contribution of this one of the original thirteen States to American history?

It would be idle for me to deny a predilection for the State of my birth; but when I record her history I am not primarily the patriot, but the investigator and, I trust, the unflinching recorder, of truth. An impartial friend of truth cannot be a constant upholder of any group or interest, either the colonists against the King, the up country against the low country, the South against the North, the common people against the aristocrats. All prove themselves to be too thoroughly human to play consistently the part of angel against the other's devil. In the face of certain powerful climatic and geological conditions, the people of South Carolina have sought to realize certain economic, political, and social ideals. It is our task to study the successes and failures of this human element operating in conjunction with these natural forces.

My obligations to the friends who assisted me in my three-volume history extend to them in this one-volume edition. Mr. Howard B. Carlisle has afforded valuable help by the use of his law library and his extensive knowledge of legal history. The wide knowledge and critical ability of Mr. A. S. Salley and the consultations and loans of rare material by the late Dr. Yates Snowden have been of inestimable value. Valuable also as lenders of rare material or facilities for work or as translators of foreign languages were the services of the former Presidents of the University of South Carolina D. M. Douglas and L. T. Baker; the

-vii-

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