South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII
DEPRESSION AND PAPER MONEY, 1725-1730

ARTHUR MIDDLETON, the eldest member, as president of the Council assumed the administration on May 7, 1725, a few days before Governor Nicholson's departure at the beginning of a period of difficulty and confusion. The fortunate outcome of Middleton's management of the critical Spanish and Indian problem as related above was not paralleled in his handling of domestic affairs.

Sale of Offices, Defaults, etc. --Middleton rendered his position, trying enough amid prolonged economic depression and popular passion, worse by his lack of sympathy with popular distress, his hauteur, and his practicing in a more than usually offensive form the bad custom of selling offices. Benjamin Whitaker, at this time Attorney General and later Speaker of the Commons and Chief Justice, was one of the ablest and most rigorous opponents of public abuses. On January 28, 1726, he wrote to Governor Nicholson in England that President Middleton had sent word to Mr. Killpatrick that he might have Clerk of the Crown and Court Coulliette's place for £300 currency. To his plea of no money, Middleton replied that he would take his bond endorsed by a friend who had married a rich widow. An attempt was then made to sell the office to another, whom Middleton caused to petition him to remove Coulliette for incompetence; but the simple gentleman offered no money, and the President bestowed the office on Childermas Croft for £200 cash.

The place of vendue master went to a favorite without the other applicants' having a chance to bid. The attempt to run the price of the provost marshalship up £100 by deceit failed, and it went at half price for £200. Such corruption, Whitaker continued, is condemned in a native South Carolinian who formerly denounced the Proprietors for such practices. He did take £200 for the office, Middleton wrote Nicholson, but he did it openly, and discharged Coulliette only on the judge's complaint. This place and the other two "have been looked upon as perquisites of the government, and something has always been given for them, and how it now comes to be a crime in me, I can't tell. Indeed your Excellency did not, but that was your own goodness, and you spent many thousand pounds in the country more than you got," but, he added, he could not afford it.

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.