South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
FRONTIER POLICY AND INDIAN WARS, 1746-1761

Building Fort Prince George. --Glen's conference of 1746 and purchase of the lands below Long Canes in 1747 barely held the Cherokees from the French. The Franco-British peace of 1748 was hardly more than a truce. The American forests during the following years teemed with the emissaries of both governments seeking to secure the aid of the powerful Indian nations for the coming grapple for supremacy. By 1750 the French were thus undermining South Carolina's western wall, the Creeks; her northwestern barrier, the Cherokees; and her outlying defense, the Chickasaws. In the war that followed between the Creeks and the Cherokees South Carolina had to witness the weakening of her two chief bulwarks and also endure the danger of becoming involved herself. The danger from the Cherokees, as the nearer, was attacked first. Governor Glen and Council stopped their trade and secured similar orders from Georgia and Virginia. Glen, while smiting the Cherokees with the embargo with one hand, offered with the other goodwill on the basis of the mutual righting of wrongs.

These firm measures brought immediate results, for, of all things, the Indians despised weakness. Tacitee, the Raven of Hiwassee, alias the Mankiller, and other headmen requested a meeting at Saluda Old Town and promised to surrender the leaders in the outrages. Still mingling conciliation with firmness, Glen refused to stir from his capital, but assured them of the falsity of the reports of his intention to harry their country. On November 13, 1751, he assured an enormous delegation from the whole Cherokee Nation, who had come to him instead of his going to meet them, that none but the guilty had anything to fear, but that those must be punished. On November 26 was signed an elaborate treaty, and the one hundred and sixty-two Indians departed, loaded with the largest presents ever given and captains' commissions to several for their unbroken fidelity to the English.

Glen in 1752 successfully urged peace between the Cherokees and Creeks. The Six Nations of New York had made peace with the Cherokees and the Catawbas, and Glen successfully pointed out to the Creeks the folly of continuing at war with the northerners, who could now

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