South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

APPENDIX III
POPULATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA--1670-1950

The figures for whites are mere estimates from 1700 through 1775. The figures for Negroes are more reliable, for they are often taken from the tax books. Estimates of white population were sometimes swelled for pinched to serve a purpose.

The figures from 1790 are from the United States Census.

Data whose dates are in parentheses are from McCrady's South Carolina under the Royal Government, p. 807.

WhitesNegroesTotal
1670 About 148 5 are
known
See text of this history.
1700 About
5,500
Edward Randolph's estimate.
1715 6,000 Pub. Rec., VI, 147, saying 1,400 fighting men. Colonial estimates frequently estimate population at four or five times fighting men.
1715 6,700 Pub. Rec. VII, 114, saying 1,500 fighting men. See above.
1719 5,000 7,000 12,000 Pub. Rec., VII, 221, stating "house keepers" at 1,000.
( 1719) 6,400Gov. R. Johnson, Col. Hist. Soc. S. Car., II, 239.
1720 6,525 11,828 18,353 Tax returns. ( D. D. W. estimates 5 to white family.)
( 1721) 9,000 12,000 21,000Rep. Board of Trade, Col. Records N. Car., II, 418.
( 1721) 14,000 Drayton's View of S. Car., 193
1722 12,000 Commons Com., Nov. 23, 1722, multiplying 2,400 fighting men by 5.
( 1723) 14,000 18,000 32,000Ibid.
( 1724) 14,000 32,000 46,000Gov. Glen, Carroll's Coll., II, 261; Hewatt's Hist. of S. Car.,
II
, 266.
1730 15,000 Pub. Rec., XIV, 143. (3,000 families.)
( 1734) 7,333* 22,000 29,333 Drayton's View of S. Car., p. 193.
( 1735) 40,000 Ramsay's Hist. of S. Car., I, 110.
1736 "Near
15,000"
Commons Journal, July 17, 1736
( 1739) 40,000 Hewatt's Hist. of S. Car., II, 71.
( 1749) 25,000 39,000 64,000Gov. Glen, Carroll's Coll., II, 218.
1753 30,000 Mills, Statistics, p. 177.
1757 25,000 or
30,000
Estimate based on over 6,000 militia.
( 1760) 31,000 or
32,000
52,000 84,000 Bull, Pub. Rec., XXVIII, 348-55.
1761 30,000 57,253 87,253 Bull in PR, XIX, 83-92.
( 1763) 35,000 70,000 105,000 Bull in PR.
( 1765) 40,000 90,000 130,000 Hewatt's Hist. of S. Car., II, 292; Drayton's View of S. Car. p. 193.
( 1769) 45,000* 80,000 125,000 Lieut. Gov. Bull to Board of Trade, Dec. 6, 1769.
( 1773) 65,000 110,000 175,000 Report Hist. Com., Charleston Library, 1835, apparently on authority of Well's Register for 1774.
( 1775) 60,000* 80,000 140,000 Henry Laurens to French Minister.
( 1775) 70,000 104,000 174,000Dr. Milligan's Revue, chapter on "Colonial History of Carolinas," p. 67.
1775 93,000 Continental Congress estimate for requisitions.
1790 140,178 108,895 249,073 United States Census from 1790.
1800 196,255 149,336 345,591
1810 214,196 200,919 415,115
1820 237,440 265,301 502,741
1830 257,863 323,322 581,185
1840 259,084 335,314 594,398
1850 274,563 393,944 668,507
WhitesNegroesOthersTotal
1860 291,300 412,320 88 703,708
1870 289,667 415,814 125 705,606
1880 391,105 604,332 140 995,577
1890 462,008 688,934 207 1,151,149
1900 557,807 782,321 188 1,340,316
1910 679,161 835,843 396 1,515,400
1920 818,538 864,719 467 1,683,724
1930 944,040 793,681 1,044 1,738,765
1940 1,084,308 814,164 1,332 1,889,804
1950 2,117,027
*Probably underestimate of whites.

-709-

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