South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

APPENDIX IV
WHITE, NEGRO AND TOTAL POPULATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA BY COUNTIES, AND TOTAL FOR STATE--1700-1860
1790 1820 1840 1860
White Negro Total White Negro Total White Negro Total White Negro Total
Abbeville 7,505 1,692 9,197 13,488 9,679 23,167 13,880 15,471 29,351 11,516 20,869 32,385
Aiken
Allendale
Anderson 12,747 5,746 18,493 14,286 8,587 22,873
Bamberg
Barnwell 8,162 6,588 14,750 10,533 10,938 21,471 12,702 18,041 30,743
Beaufort 4,364 14,389 18,753 4,679 27,520 32,199 5,650 30,144 35,794 6,714 33,339 40,053
Berkeley
Calhoun
Charleston 11,801 34,843 46,647 169,376 60,836 80,212 10,921 61,740 82,661 29,136 40,912 70,100
Cherokee
Chester 5,881 985 6,866 9,611 4,578 14,189 9,889 7,858 17,747 7,096 11,024 18,122
Chesterfield ? 2,077 ? 921 ? 4,412 2,233 6,645 5,537 3,037 8,574 7,354 4,480 11,834
Clarendon 4,378 8,717 13,095
Colleton 3,601 16,737 20,338 4,341 22,063 26,404 5,874 19,674 25,548 9,255 32,661 41,916
Darlington ? 3,041 ? 1,348 ? 4,389 6,407 4,542 10,949 7,169 7,653 14,822 8,421 11,929 20,361
Dillon
Dorchester
Edgefield 9,605 3,864 13,289 12,864 12,255 25,119 15,020 17,832 32,852 15,653 24,233 39,887
Fairfield 6,138 1,485 7,623 9,378 7,796 17,174 7,587 12,578 20,165 6,373 15,738 22,111
Florence
Georgetown 1,830 15,773 17,603 2,093 16,181 18,274 3,013 18,292 21,305
Greenville 5,888 615 6,503 11,017 3,513 14,530 12,491 5,348 17,839 14,631 7,261 21,892
Greenwood
Hampton
Horry 3,568 1,457 5,025 4,154 1,601 5,755 5,564 2,398 7,962
Jasper
Kershaw 5,628 6,804 12,432 3,988 8,293 12,281 5,026 8,038 13,086
Lancaster 4,864 1,438 6,302 5,848 2,868 8,716 5,565 4,342 9,907 6,054 5,743 11,797
Laurens 8,210 1,127 9,337 12,755 4,927 17,682 12,571 9,012 21,584 10,529 13,329 23,858
Lee
Lexington 5,267 2,816 8,083 7,401 4,710 12,111 9,332 6,246 15,579
McCormick
Marion ? 5,118 ? 7,387 6,652 3,549 10,201 8,593 5,339 13,932 11,007 10,183 21,190
Marlboro ? 2,300 ? 1,019 ? 3,319 3,250 3,175 6,425 4,188 4,220 8,408 5,373 7,061 12,434
Newberry 8,186 1,156 9,342 10,177 5,927 16,104 8,208 10,142 18,350 7,000 13,879 20,879
Oconee
Orangeburg 12,412 6,101 18,513 6,760 8,893 15,653 6,321 12,198 18,519 8,108 16,788 24,896
Pendleton 8,731 837 9,568 22,140 4,882 27,011
Pickens 11,548 2,808 14,356 15,335 4,304 19,639
Richland 2,479 1,451 3,930 4,499 7,822 12,321 5,326 11,071 16,397 6,863 11,444 18,307
Saluda
Spartanburg 7,907 893 8,800 13655 3,334 16,989 17,924 5,745 23,669 18,537 8,382 26,919
Sumter 4,228 2,712 6,940 8,844 16,525 26,369 8,644 19,248 27,892 6,857 17,002 23,859
Union 6,430 1,263 7,693 9,786 4,340 14,126 10,485 8,451 18,936 8,670 10,965 19,635
Williamsburg 2,795 5,921 8,716 3,327 7,000 10327 5,187 10,302 15,489
York 5,652 952 6,604 10,251 4,685 14,936 11,449 6,934 18,383 11,329 10,173 21,502
Total* 140,178 108,895 249,073 237,440 265,301 502,741 259,084 335,314 594,398 291,300 412,320 703,620
Others ‡88
Grand Total 249,073 502,741 594,398 703,708
Free Negroes† 1,801 6,826 8,276 9,914
*Totals are correct for State, though occasionally figures for a county are lacking. Figures are for areas of dates indicated.
New districts or counties diminished the size of some old ones.
†These totals of free Negroes for the State are included in figures for each county. Charleston contained over a third of the
free Negroes.
‡Occasionally the total for a county exceeds the sum of whites and Negroes on account of including other races.

-710-

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