Japan-American Diplomatic Relations in the Meiji-Taisho Era

By Kamikawa Hikomatsu | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
THE DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS BETWEEN JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES OVER THE PROBLEM OF THE MANCHURIAN RAILWAY

A. Harriman's Proposal For Joint Management of the Manchurian Railway by Japan and the United States

In the spring of 1905, at the suggestion of American Minister Lloyd C. Griscom, Edward Y. Harriman, an American railway magnate, decided to visit Japan. Harriman had a deep interest in the Far East. His objective on this trip was to acquire commercial rights for the United States in this area and to establish a Round-the World-Route under American control, through Manchuria, Siberia and European Russia. According to his plan, he was going to put the Manchuria Railway under his control, buy out the East China Railway and acquire the trade rights between North Manchuria, Siberia, and European Russia. His Pacific Mail liners would cross the Atlantic and connect with his railways in the United States. He was sure that because of financial difficulties after the war, Japan would part with the half-equipped Manchurian Railway although she came into possession of it at a large sacrifice, and that Russia had no reason to maintain the East China Railway since she had lost Port Arthur. With this in view, Harriman, with wife, children and a large suite, arrived at Yokohama on board the Siberia on August 31, 1905.

The government and the people of Japan gave him a hearty welcome. At a party with Prime Minister Katsura and other senior statesmen, he proposed a plan for the joint management of the Manchurian Railway by Japan and the United States, as a part of his Round-the-World-Route. Minister Griscom and Durham W. Stevens, an advisor to the Foreign Office, actively

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Japan-American Diplomatic Relations in the Meiji-Taisho Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 462

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.