International Business-Government Communications: U.S. Structures, Actors, and Issues

By Jack N. Behrman; J. J. Boddewyn et al. | Go to book overview

7
U.S. Government Alternatives

The evidence of the previous chapters is that the State Department and embassies are involved in a variety of relationships with international companies and have, at times, extended considerable assistance. But the growth of international business is such that these contacts will undoubtedly increase, in both developing and advanced countries-raising the question of the readiness of the U.S. government to play an expanded role, if it decided from a policy standpoint to do so.

To play a more effective role in its relations with U.S. international business the State Department should adopt several measures, in stages or simultaneously. They include an improvement in the procedures of communication and attitudes of cooperation with business; a shift in the international economic priorities away from the postwar criteria and assumptions toward recognition of the increasingly important role played by international companies under new criteria; and reorientation of the elements of the Department dealing with international business. The argument of this chapter leads to the conclusion that all three steps are needed within a relatively short period, though one would have to expect a bureaucratic miracle to be optimistic about the time that will be required. Even if not all can be accomplished soon they should be taken in order, for those discussed last cannot be successful without the preceding changes.


Improvement in Communication and Cooperation

Those officials with whom we discussed these problems around the world-company, host government, and U.S. embassies--repeatedly emphasized that the first priority in improving government-business relations was a significant change in attitudes on the part of all parties concerned. With a change in these attitudes would come a change in the relationships of business to governments, which would itself reinforce the change of attitudes. As a result of these changes new mechanisms of cooperation and communication would likely be developed out of initiatives on the parts of business, the U.S. government, and host governments.


Attitudes

Many of those we interviewed showed a genuine willingness to change past attitudes and a wide recognition that it is time to do so. Frequently, younger offi

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Business-Government Communications: U.S. Structures, Actors, and Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.