Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation

By James Parton; T. W. Higginson et al. | Go to book overview

LYDIA MARIA CHILD.

BY T. W. HIGGINSON.

To those of us who are by twenty years or more the juniors of Mrs. Child, she presents herself rather as an object of love than of cool criticism, even if we have rarely met her face to face. In our earliest recollections she comes before us less as author or philanthropist than as some kindly and omnipresent aunt, beloved forever by the heart of childhood, -- some one gifted with all lore, and furnished with unfathomable resources, -- some one discoursing equal delight to all members of the household. In those days she seemed to supply a sufficient literature for any family through her own unaided pen. Thence came novels for the parlor, cookery-books for the kitchen, and the "Juvenile Miscellany" for the nursery. In later years the intellectual provision still continued. We learned, from her anti-slavery writings, where to find our duties; from her "Letters from New York," where to seek our purest pleasures; while her "Progress of Religious Ideas" introduced us to those profounder truths on which pleasures and duties alike rest. It is needless to debate whether she has done the greatest or most permanent work in any especial department of literature, she has done work so valuable in many. She has shown memorable independence in repeatedly leaving beaten paths to strike out for herself new literary directions, and has combined the authorship of more than thirty books and

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Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • List of Engravings. iii
  • Preface v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Florence Nightingale. 11
  • Lydia Maria Child. 38
  • Fanny Fern -- Mrs. Parton. 66
  • Lydia H. Sigourney. *
  • Mrs. Frances Anne Kemble. 102
  • Eugenie, Empress of the French. 128
  • Grace Greenwood -- Mrs. LIppincott 147
  • Alice and Phebe Cary. 164
  • Margaret Fuller Ossoli. *
  • Gail Hamilton -- Miss Dodge. 202
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning. *
  • Jenny LInd Goldschmidt. 250
  • Our Pioneer Educators. 272
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe. 296
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. 332
  • The Woman's Rights Movement and Its Champions in the United States. 362
  • Victoria, Queen of England. *
  • Eminent Women of the Drama. 439
  • Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. *
  • Woman as Physician. 513
  • Camilla Urso. 551
  • Harriet G. Hosmer. 566
  • Rosa Bonheur. 599
  • Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. 621
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