Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation

By James Parton ; Horace Greeley et al. | Go to book overview

GRACE GREENWOOD -- MRS. LIPPINCOTT

BY JOSEPH B. LYMAN.

ABOUT thirty years ago, when Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren lived in the White House; when questions of a national bank and a protective tariff interested without arousing the popular mind; when the great and glorious valley of the Mississippi still gave homes to the red man and haunts to wild beasts; when Bryant was fresh from those native hills, broad, round, and green, where he dreamed the Thanatopsis; when visions of Absalom and Jephthah's daughter were floating fresh and sacred before the eyes of Willis, -- a traveller through Pompey, one of the youthful towns of western New York, might have turned in his saddle to take a second look at the lithe figure and the glowing face of a village romp. Could such tourist have known that, in the bright-eyed school-girl with rustic dress and touseled hair, he saw one of the rising lights of the coming age; a letter- writer who should charm a million readers by the piquant dash and spicy flavor of her style; a delightful magazinist; a poetess, the melody and ring of whose stanzas should remind us of the most famous lyres of the world; a woman who, standing calm, graceful, and self-poised before great audiences, and thrilling them by noble and earnest words spoken in the deep gloom of national disaster, should call up rich memories of the Roman matron in her noblest form, or of the brightest figures that move on the storied page of France, --

-147-

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Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • List of Engravings. iii
  • Preface v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Florence Nightingale. 11
  • Lydia Maria Child. 38
  • Fanny Fern -- Mrs. Parton. 66
  • Lydia H. Sigourney. *
  • Mrs. Frances Anne Kemble. 102
  • Eugenie, Empress of the French. 128
  • Grace Greenwood -- Mrs. LIppincott 147
  • Alice and Phebe Cary. 164
  • Margaret Fuller Ossoli. *
  • Gail Hamilton -- Miss Dodge. 202
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning. *
  • Jenny LInd Goldschmidt. 250
  • Our Pioneer Educators. 272
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe. 296
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. 332
  • The Woman's Rights Movement and Its Champions in the United States. 362
  • Victoria, Queen of England. *
  • Eminent Women of the Drama. 439
  • Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. *
  • Woman as Physician. 513
  • Camilla Urso. 551
  • Harriet G. Hosmer. 566
  • Rosa Bonheur. 599
  • Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. 621
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