Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation

By James Parton; T. W. Higginson et al. | Go to book overview

MRS. ELIZABETH CADY STANTON.

BY THEODORE TILTON.

I ONCE watched an artist while he tried to transfer to his canvas the lustre of a precious stone. His picture, after his utmost skill, was dull. A radiant and sparkling woman, full of wit, reason, and fancy, is a whole crown of jewels. A poor, opaque copy of her is the most that one can render in a biographical sketch.

Elizabeth Cady, daughter of Judge Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston, was born November 12th, 1816, in Johnstown, New York, -- forty miles north of Albany.

Birthplace is a secondary percentage, and transmits character. Elizabeth's birthplace was more famous half a century ago than since; for then, though small, it was a marked intellectual centre; and now, though large, it is an unmarked manufacturing town. Before her birth, it was the vice-ducal seat of Sir William Johnson, the famous English negotiator with the Indians. During her girlhood, it was an arena for the intellectual wrestlings of Kent, Tompkins, Spencer, Elisha Williams, and Abraham Van Vechten, who, as lawyers, were among the chiefest of their time. It is now devoted mainly to the fabrication of steel springs and buckskin gloves. So, like Wordsworth's early star, "it has faded into the light of common day."

A Yankee said that his chief ambition was to become more

-332-

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Eminent Women of the Age: Being Narratives of the Lives and Deeds of the Most Prominent Women of the Present Generation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • List of Engravings. iii
  • Preface v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Florence Nightingale. 11
  • Lydia Maria Child. 38
  • Fanny Fern -- Mrs. Parton. 66
  • Lydia H. Sigourney. *
  • Mrs. Frances Anne Kemble. 102
  • Eugenie, Empress of the French. 128
  • Grace Greenwood -- Mrs. LIppincott 147
  • Alice and Phebe Cary. 164
  • Margaret Fuller Ossoli. *
  • Gail Hamilton -- Miss Dodge. 202
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning. *
  • Jenny LInd Goldschmidt. 250
  • Our Pioneer Educators. 272
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe. 296
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. 332
  • The Woman's Rights Movement and Its Champions in the United States. 362
  • Victoria, Queen of England. *
  • Eminent Women of the Drama. 439
  • Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. *
  • Woman as Physician. 513
  • Camilla Urso. 551
  • Harriet G. Hosmer. 566
  • Rosa Bonheur. 599
  • Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. 621
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