Holy Scripture: Canon, Authority, Criticism

By James Barr | Go to book overview

II Biblical authority and biblical criticism in the conflict of church traditions

THE distinction established in the first chapter between the situation where the Bible already stood complete as an acknowledged and delimited canon and the situation of the men of the Bible themselves, who in many respects did not have any such complete 'scripture', has now received a preliminary discussion in respect of the biblical evidence itself. But before we go farther we should provide another preliminary discussion, which will concern primarily the outworking of these problems in the more modern theological tradition, especially from the Reformation to the present day.

We may start once again with Protestant orthodoxy, for which the doctrine of scripture was of absolutely paramount importance: the Westminster Confession, a good example, placed its formulation of this doctrine right at the beginning, before any other matters at all were considered. Scripture was given by inspiration of God, and the scope of its operation was defined with extreme precision: all the sixty-six books of the (Protestant) canon were completely inspired; no other books were inspired at all; everything else, however good, belonged at the best to human tradition or ecclesiastical opinion. Verbal inspiration meant that all the words of the text of exactly these books were inspired and therefore infallible. All doctrinal formulation was to be strictly guided and controlled by scripture and by no other comparable source of authority: the physical manifestation of this is provided by the mass of proof-texts attached as footnotes to the Confession.

One of the difficulties about this lies, however, in the question of the canon itself. It was impossible to provide scriptural proof for this most central of questions, namely, which precisely were the books which had been divinely inspired. No passage in either Old or New Testament gave a list, nor indeed, as we shall shortly see, did any passage give

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holy Scripture: Canon, Authority, Criticism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.