California's Prodigal Sons: Hiram Johnson and the Progressives, 1911-1917

By Spencer C. Olin | Go to book overview

5
ACCEPTANCE AND REJECTION IN 1913

Having devoted most of their energies to the national campaign in 1912, Hiram Johnson and his advisers turned their complete attention the following year to state matters. Originally their reform goals had been three: "turn out the railroad villains," "purify" the administration of governmental affairs, and "democratize" the political system. Such a general program had offended few people and had received enthusiastic endorsement by a large majority of the state's citizens. In fact, the great strength of the reform movement of 1910-1911 was due to the relatively uncontroversial nature of its "ideology" and to its consequent broad appeal.1

Yet even before the end of the legislative session of 1911 Arthur J. Pillsbury, an editor of the California Outlook who was later appointed to Johnson's new Industrial Accident Commission, had counseled caution. Writing under the byline "The Watchman," he had advised the Johnson

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California's Prodigal Sons: Hiram Johnson and the Progressives, 1911-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents x
  • 1 - The Genesis of Reform 1
  • 2 - "A Fight Against the Interests" 20
  • 3 - Onward Christian Capitalists 34
  • 4 - The "Bull Moose" Campaign 57
  • 5 - Acceptance and Rejection In 1913 70
  • 6 - Mutiny and Party Discord 92
  • 7 - The Declining Years 104
  • 8 - Disintegration and Deadlock 117
  • 9 - Blunder Begets Blunder 128
  • 10 - The Initial Response 145
  • 11 - The Final Response 156
  • 12 - An Appraisal 169
  • Appendix I 183
  • Appendix II 185
  • Appendix III 187
  • Index 243
  • Index 245
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