CHAPTER X
PASTOR AND PREACHER1

WHEN I returned to Terre Haute in the fall of 1861, all hopes of a holiday march to Richmond and a brief campaign and a speedy end of the Confederate Republic were over. The disastrous battle of Bull Run had made clear to the North the seriousness of its undertaking, and the Act of Congress authorizing a loan of two hundred and fifty million dollars reflected the public consciousness and the public resolve. From this time on the war excitement made spiritual work in the parish difficult.

One Fourth of July two celebrations were held, one by the "Butternuts," as the sympathizers with secession were called, the other by the loyalists. There was reasonable dread of a collision between the two. But forewarned is forearmed, and the day passed peacefully. Once we were thrown into alarm by the report of a threatened raid by Morgan's Confederate cavalry. They did, in fact, cross the border, but did not come as far north as Terre Haute. We organized a secret Loyal League, the only secret society I ever joined. I do not remember that it had any very important secrets to preserve, or that it ever accomplished any particular

____________________
1
A true report of the experiences of a pastor and preacher is necessarily made up of incidents generally insignificant in themselves and without apparent connection with each other. I am not, however, without hope that this chapter, which is such a report, may serve as an encouragement to some ministers discouraged as I was discouraged, and an inspiration to some parishes to do for their minister what my considerate and loyal parish did for me.

-214-

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