CHAPTER IX
Kabuki and the Western Room

THROUGHOUT its history the pattern of Kabuki development was to absorb all new and attractive theatrical material created outside the walls of the theatre and incorporate this into the mainstream of Kabuki tradition. It utilized the Nō, the doll theatre, dances of all varieties and sources, history and legend, and, insofar as it was permitted, contemporary event. The casual, gradual absorption of these materials was easily accomplished aesthetically, for the general uniformity of attitude and taste throughout the country, as well as the limitation on material caused by the isolation of Japan, resulted in the evolution of forms which possessed certain basic common characteristics. Furthermore, at the time the process of assimilation was taking place, the Kabuki had already firmly established its aesthetic tradition. New elements could therefore be adopted into it without working any significant or essential changes in its form. Influences from the outside world penetrated into the Kabuki only after they had been generally absorbed into Tokugawa society, and by that time these influences had been made so thoroughly Japanese that they had ceased to be foreign. An occasional foreign novelty might be taken directly into the theatre, which constantly sought novel means of intriguing its audience; a telescope, for example, figures prominently in the first act of Through the Iga Pass. But during the Tokugawa period the Kabuki was entirely free from any direct influence of foreign drama. There is some evidence that a stage was built in the Kurishitan Church at Nagasaki and that mystery plays of the European kind were performed there. It seems likely that the Catholic missionaries would have utilized this method of

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Kabuki Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Table of Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II - The Development of the Physical Theatre 24
  • Chapter III - The Audience and Its Attitudes 67
  • Chapter IV - The Hanamichi 92
  • Chapter V - Elements of the Performance 105
  • Chapter VI - The Stage 127
  • Chapter VII - The Actor 164
  • Chapter VIII - Plays and Characters 205
  • Chapter IX - Kabuki and the Western Room 248
  • Short Glossary of Theatre Terms 283
  • Selected Bibliography of Works In Western Languages 288
  • Index 291
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.