Scottsboro Boy

By Haywood Patterson; Earl Conrad | Go to book overview

"You-all tangled me up in it. I don't know nothing about it."

"You don't know nothing about it?"

"No, them Scottsboro jurors, they know all about it. Ask them."

They went. None of us bit. There wasn't a fool fish among us.

We had been in the death row two years.

On the night before March 21, 1933, we were told to get set to go up to Birmingham jail the next morning to wait for our new trial.

We boys wanted to take what few little belongings we had. L. J. Burrs, he said, "Hell, leave all that here, you'll be back." That wasn't all we left for Burrs. We had our opinions of the death house and we left them in the beds and covered them with sheets. We gave them a nasty job.

They had put it on us and we put it on them. In hell, if the guests get the chance, they don't treat the devil any better than he treats them.


Chapter 7

MY second trial they put on at Decatur, in Morgan County, Alabama. It was very exciting. So much doing and so much fairer than the first at Scottsboro. They had separated my case from the others and were trying me first.

Samuel Liebowitz, in pitching for me, he was a big New York lawyer then, began right in taking the skin off the Alabama jury system. He wanted to bring out that Negroes were not on the jury roll in Jackson County where I was first tried, and not in Morgan County. That would make a ground to carry the case to the Supreme Court again if the jury found me guilty.

Liebowitz and Attorney General Tom Knight started fussing right off. The New York lawyer called Negroes to find out if they had ever been asked to serve on an Alabama jury. One colored man, John Sanford, he was about fifty, it was brought out he was a good citizen. Knight started saying, "All right now, John--"

-35-

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Scottsboro Boy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One: - The Big Frame 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 10
  • Chapter 3 15
  • Chapter 5 21
  • Chapter 6 24
  • Chapter 7 30
  • Chapter 8 35
  • Chapter 9 44
  • Chapter II 57
  • Part Two: - Murderers' Home: 1937-1943 71
  • Chapter 1 73
  • Chapter 3 79
  • Chapter 4 85
  • Chapter 5 98
  • Chapter 6 102
  • Chapter 7 116
  • Chapter 10 140
  • Part Three - Kilby: 1943-1948 169
  • Chapter 3 190
  • Chapter 5 202
  • Chapter 6 208
  • Chapter 7 215
  • Timetable of Events in the Scottsboro Case 299
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