Scottsboro Boy

By Haywood Patterson; Earl Conrad | Go to book overview

minute. Everybody's heart would be with the man making a getaway. Sometimes you could hear the barking get awful loud and hot and you knew they were up on a man. Like once a guy ran down in the swamp not far from where we were working. Thirty minutes later we heard he was dead. They killed him but they pretended he killed himself. They said he cut his own throat. A man didn't have to cut his own throat when a dozen dogs were there to do the job better.

The love of life was inside all of those men, the sane and the insane.

It was in me too.

Escape became my great study.

In my mind was growing a map of the countryside. I knew the farms and roads, the towns and trains all around here.

They didn't know what I was thinking. What I was planning. I just said, "Yes sub, Captain,""Whatever you say, Captain," "Coming right along now, Captain."

But I could see the future, and me and it ran north.


Chapter 9

LATE in 1941 and through the spring of 1942 I was on the inside again. I didn't have to go out each day and get slopped up in the winter mud. I was in on all the soft rackets. I had a deal with a white commissary boy, Tommy O'Dwyer. He gave me meat and in return I let him use one of my radios during the day. I had two radios. A friend of the International Labor Defense, Hester Huntington, sent them to me. She was a very fine white woman living in New England. She sent all us Scottsboro boys things we needed. She would be in touch with Allan Knight Chalmers up in Boston and Anna Damon, the I.L.D. secretary, in New York. So between the three of them I was not forgotten.

But I had troubles inside.

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scottsboro Boy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One: - The Big Frame 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 10
  • Chapter 3 15
  • Chapter 5 21
  • Chapter 6 24
  • Chapter 7 30
  • Chapter 8 35
  • Chapter 9 44
  • Chapter II 57
  • Part Two: - Murderers' Home: 1937-1943 71
  • Chapter 1 73
  • Chapter 3 79
  • Chapter 4 85
  • Chapter 5 98
  • Chapter 6 102
  • Chapter 7 116
  • Chapter 10 140
  • Part Three - Kilby: 1943-1948 169
  • Chapter 3 190
  • Chapter 5 202
  • Chapter 6 208
  • Chapter 7 215
  • Timetable of Events in the Scottsboro Case 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.