Philosophy and the American School: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education

By Van Cleve Morris | Go to book overview

EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION

In Philosophy and the American School Van Cleve Morris brings to the much discussed but fundamentally neglected area of educational philosophy a remarkable and individual insight grounded in solid scholarship. What is even more important, this book is consistently focused on the application of the principles of philosophy in actual, day-to-day practice; hence it serves to guide both the classroom teacher and the school administrator in formulating a workable and truly personal educational philosophy.

Dr. Morris first considers basic philosophical questions, then undertakes a detailed description and analysis of the principal schools of philosophic thought, supplementing the various source materials and refer. ences with his own keen interpretation and comment. Then, asking how these ideas may be used to understand and evaluate what is going on in American education today, he deals with the specific problems of teaching, supervision, and administration, examining innovations and new practices as well as long-established procedures and showing how different practices relate to the major philosophies.

A classroom teacher as well as a philosopher, Dr. Morris has studied in his field of specialization in several of the nation's most distinguished colleges and universities. While he has for a number of years been recognized as an able, stimulating, and challenging teacher and a popular lecturer, this book is certain to mark Dr. Morris as an equally brilliant writer. The student preparing for a professional career in education, the experienced teacher, the school principal, the supervisor or director of personnel, and the school superintendent -- all will find this book helpful, as will the layman who seeks an understanding of the relationship between philosophic principles and the practice of education. Annotated bibliographies and questions for discussion follow each chapter, and original figures and charts effectively highlight the text; the closing chapter, expressive of the author's emphasis on the individual, outlines a procedure for building a personal philosophy of education. Pioneering in its approach, unique in its organization and treatment, Philosophy and the American School throws light on a field too long characterized by uncertainty, doubt, and confusion. As a teaching text it is a major and distinctive contribution to the literature of education.

HEROLD C. HUNT

-v-

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