The Race Question in Modern Science: Race and Science

By Unesco | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

ACTION BY UNESCO

Racial doctrine is the outcome of a fundamentally antirational system of thought and is in glaring conflict with the whole humanist tradition of our civilization. It sets at nought everything that Unesco stands for and endeavours to defend. By virtue of its very Constitution, Unesco must face the racial problem: the preamble to that document declares that 'the great and terrible war which has now ended was a war made possible by the denial of the democratic principles of the dignity, equality and mutual respect of men, and by the propagation, in their place, through ignorance and prejudice, of the doctrine of the inequality of men and races'.

Because of its structure and the tasks assigned to it, Unesco is the international institution best equipped to lead the campaign against race prejudice and to extirpate this most dangerous of doctrines. Race hatred and conflict thrive on scientifically false ideas and are nourished by ignorance. In order to show up these errors of fact and reasoning, to make widely known the conclusions reached in various branches of science, to combat racial propaganda, we must turn to the means and methods of education, science and culture, which are precisely the three domains in which Unesco's activities are exerted; it is on this threefold front that the battle against all forms of racism must be engaged.

The plan laid down by the Organization proceeds from a resolution [116 (VI) B (iii)] adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council at its sixth session, asking Unesco 'to consider the desirability of initiating and recom-

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The Race Question in Modern Science: Race and Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Part One 11
  • Racial Myths 13
  • Conclusion 52
  • Race and Society 57
  • Conclusion 101
  • Bibliography 106
  • The Jewish People: - A Biological History 107
  • Race and Culture 181
  • Bibliography 217
  • Race and History 219
  • Bibliography 258
  • Part Two 261
  • Race and Biology 263
  • Bibliography 299
  • The Significance of Racial Differences 301
  • Race Mixture 343
  • Bibliography 389
  • Part Three 391
  • The Roots of Prejudice 393
  • Conclusion 419
  • Race and Psychology 423
  • Race Relations and Mental Health 453
  • Appendix 493
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