The Urban Plantation: Racism & Colonialism in the Post Civil Rights Era

By Robert Staples | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
Blacks in Politics: A Case Study in Neo-Colonialism

The right to vote for a candidate of one's choice in political elections is the one characteristic that allegedly distinguishes the United States from the Soviet Union. Theoretically, any race or class has its interests represented by democratically elected members of the legislative and executive branches of government. As true of many American creeds, the concept of political democracy has never been fully applied to black Americans.

Blacks arrived on U.S. shores in 1619, but they did not get the right to vote until the passage of the 14th Amendment in 1865. That legal right could not be exercised for 70 years after the Reconstruction era due to a series of disenfranchising codes and acts of violence and suppression against blacks by the Ku Klux Klan and other white groups. Only after passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 did blacks regain the voting franchise in the South. The effect of the Voting Rights Act can be seen in the increase of black elected officials from 1,160 in 1969 to 6,056 in 1985.1

Although blacks are approximately 15 percent of the voting age population in the U.S., they only hold 1.2 percent of all elective offices in the country. Black voting strength is diluted by a number of factors, including reapportionment and gerrymandering practices that favor white voters and the lower percentage of black voter turnout. In 1984, only 56 percent of voting age blacks actually voted, compared to 61 percent of the white voting age population.2

This racial differential in voter turnout seems strange in light of the importance of government policies to most black Americans. Aside from their dependence on governmental bodies to insure their civil rights, black people, more than whites, look to the political arena as a source of jobs and services. As Landry has noted, government jobs were the first

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Urban Plantation: Racism & Colonialism in the Post Civil Rights Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.