The Autobiography of Leigh Hunt: With Reminiscences of Friends and Contemporaries - Vol. 1

By Leigh Hunt | Go to book overview

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF LEIGH HUNT.

CHAPTER I.
THE AUTHOR'S PROGENITORS.

Fetching a man's mind from his cradle.--Transmission of family faces and qualities.--Childhood a favorite theme in after-life.--The author's ancestors and father.--Perils of the latter during the American Revolution.--Compliment paid him by the father of Sheridan.-- His answer to a bishop, and general character and career.--Becomes tutor to the nephew of the Duke of Chandos.--Accidental death of that nobleman, and affecting end of his duchess.--Misfortunes in the author's family.--His mother and her connections.--Her behavior during her voyage to England; admirable conduct on various other occasions; and love of the sunset during her decline.

THE circumstances that led to this Autobiography will transpire in the course of it. Suffice it to say for the present, that a more involuntary production it would be difficult to conceive; though I trust it will not be found destitute of the entertainment which any true account of experiences in the life of a human being must of necessity, perhaps, contain.

I claim no importance for any thing which I have done or undergone, but on grounds common to the interests of all, and to the willing sympathy of my brother-lovers of books. Should I be led at any time into egotisms of a nature that seem to think otherwise, I blush beforehand for the mischance, and beg it to considered as alien from my habits of reflection. I have had vanities enough in my day; and, as the reader will see, became aware of them. If I have any remaining,

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