The City after the Automobile: An Architect's Vision

By Moshe Safdie; Wendy E. Kohn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8 Planning the Region

Making Places

A memorable place often occupies an important feature in the landscape: a harbor, a bay, a river delta, a lake, a hill within a town -- a physical event in the natural environment. We remember places that are dignified by a unique interaction between the man-made and the natural, places like Naples by the bay, Geneva at the lake's end, Rome on the Tiber's bend, Cape Town with Table Mountain, Amsterdam and its canals, or Ronda, Spain, a city bridging between two cliffs. Not only are these places set in special points in the landscape, but their own construction often amplifies their surroundings: an alignment of buildings on the watershed to overlook views ( Jerusalem), buildings that contain the curve of a harbor (Cannes), an important bridge to cross a river (the Ponte Vecchio). Great urban streets frequently maintain specific relationships to the natural terrain ( Barcelona's Ramblas descending to the bay) and link the most intense urban activity with great parks and gardens ( Fifth Avenue in New York City, the Champs Elysées in Paris, or Regent Street in London).

What we recognize as the special character of a city is the synthesis of an identifiable spatial structure with the unique mysteries and secrets of its site. As we know, many urban centers share the same generic diagram (a grid or radiating

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The City after the Automobile: An Architect's Vision
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Moshe Safdie ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Part I Visions of the City 1
  • Chapter 1 the Ailing City 3
  • Chapter 2 the Evolving City 11
  • Chapter 3 the End of the City 27
  • Part Ii Facing Reality 37
  • Chapter 4 the Making of Public Space 39
  • Chapter 5 Working in the City 55
  • Chapter 6 Living in the City 69
  • Chapter 7 Confronting Mega-Scale 85
  • Part III Toward the Future 101
  • Chapter 8 Planning the Region 103
  • Chapter 9 Traveling the Region 123
  • Chapter 10 the Utility Car 137
  • Chapter 11 the City After the Automobile 151
  • Epilogue: Urbana 169
  • End Notes 175
  • Index 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.