CHAPTER III
The Dawn of Recorded History:
Alexander and Asoka

The dawn of recorded Indian history can be placed around 600 B.C. Though no exact dates can be supplied for the next two centuries, we are able to obtain a general, if rather vague, picture from a variety of sources. The information mainly concerns the northern parts, it is true, but this was the scene of most vital change. There are inferences to be drawn from the epics; there are dynastic lists to be studied in the Puranas;1 there are Buddhist and Jain writings and there is the Ceylonese historical chronicle, the Mahavamsa. From these sources it can be seen that the center of political gravity has moved still further eastward. As the Panjab in Vedic times gave place to Indraprastha ( Delhi) and Hastinapura on the upper Jumna and Ganges in Epic days, so these places have yielded in importance to the modern region of Oudh in western Uttar Pradesh and Behar south of the Ganges. Ayodhya, Rama's city, was the capital of Kosala in Oudh. Banaras appears in history as the sacred city of Kashi, while near the modern Patna was the city of Pataliputra, the capital af Magadha in modern Behar. It can be loosely said that Ayodhya and Pataliputra have taken the place of Indraprastha and Hastinapura. In the south there is evidence of the process of the peaceful penetration of Hindu culture and of kingdoms formed along the eastern coastal plain or the Coromandel coast of South India. The kingdoms mentioned were larger than those of Epic days but none as yet approached the dimensions of an empire. Magadha, of whose kings in two dynasties to 322 B.C. we have some information, was probably the leading state. In the sphere of culture, both Jainism and Buddhism took their rise.

In the northwest the position was obscure, but it is here that we have the first evidence in Indian history of foreign political intervention as

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
India: A Modern History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.