CHAPTER XVI
British and French

We have noted the decline of the Mughal Empire, under whose aegis the British had been trading for nearly a century and a half. We have seen how their rivals, after undermining the Mughal power, proceeded to tear each other to pieces, finally falling out among themselves and splitting into contending factions. The stage of north India was thus left to such untutored bodies as the Sikhs and the Jats and any stray Persian and Afghan adventurers who attached themselves to the emperor at Delhi. What of the rest of India? Before the final collapse of the fifties the rest of northern India had become a number of virtually independent states. The Nawabs of Oudh, with the title of Wazir of the Empire, controlled what is now the core of the state of Uttar Pradesh. The three provinces of Bengal, Behar, and Orissa, the most productive part of India, were ruled with Mughal forms by a military adventurer, Alivardi Khan. In the center and west of India, from Orissa to Poona, the Marathas held sway. To the south a confused power struggle was taking place. The Mughal viceroy of the Deccan, the Nizam-ul-Mulk or Regulator of the Kingdom, had been a de facto independent ruler since 1724. His dominions formed a Mughal empire in little. With the capital at Hyderabad, it extended down the east coast from the borders of Orissa to the neighborhood of Tanjore. The northern portion of this coastline, as far south as Masulipatam, was called the northern Sarkars or districts; the southern portion was the coastal and fertile plain of the Carnatic where much fine weaving was done. It was also known as the coast of Coromandel, or the country of the Cholas, a Hindu dynasty which had disappeared nearly five hundred years before. To the northwest it approached Poona at Aurangabad and to the south its frontier ran along the river Tungabhadra, a tributary of the great Kistna. South of this river lay the Hindu kingdom of Mysore, destined to grow in strength under the direction of a Muslim adventurer, Haidar Ali. The tropical and hilly Malabar Coast on the west was divided between a

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
India: A Modern History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.