CHAPTER XXXII
Nonco-operation and Reform

"The shadow of Amritsar," said the Duke of Connaught when inaugurating the new legislatures in 1921, "lengthened over the fair face of India." Its effect was one of delayed action, like a time bomb or shock after an accident. At first the Panjab was cowed into quiescence, and men praised the strong men who had saved India from revolution. General Dyer went off to the Afghan war with the Panjab governor's praises ringing in his ears. It was only gradually that the facts, and still more their implications, leaked out in India itself, and it was not till the autumn that they aroused serious concern in Britain. Those months were the summer of the peace treaty, with its fevered effort to forget the war in pleasure, its short-lived, unhealthy prosperity, its neurotic narcissism. No one wanted to face a fresh crisis anywhere. In the autumn liberal opinion (still strong in Britain) bestirred itself, and a commission of four Indians and four Europeans, presided over by a judge, Lord Hunter, was appointed. Amritsar became a subject of discussion and soon an issue of acute dissension among the British themselves, and between them and the Indians. Briefly the issue was, had the Indian empire been saved by an act of terrorism and was terrorism justified to maintain the raj? Behind this came the deeper question, was an Indian life of equal value to a European one? Was there, in short, one standard or two for the two races? The division was not wholly on party lines, for there were many imperialists who believed in the sacredness of all individual life as much as in the imperial mission of uplift. To these people Amritsar was a ghastly mistake. There were also left-wing people who did not believe in racial equality. The controversy, in fact, brought to the forefront the very issue of racial equality which the government of India for many years had tried to avoid. The inquiry brought the issue to a focus, because General Dyer gloried in his deed. "If more troops had been present," he said in evidence,1 "the effect would have been greater in proportion. It was no

-347-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
India: A Modern History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.