NOTES

NOTES TO CHAPTER I
1. They are the Rig,Sama,Yajur, and Atharvaveda. The Samaveda is a hymn book for sacrifices copied from the Rigveda except for 75 stanzas; the Yajurveda is also largely drawn from the Rigveda; the Atharvaveda is largely a collection of spells, which, though very ancient, are also very obscure.
2. Book VII, No. 77, Hindu Scriptures, ed. N. Macnicol ( 1938).
3. Sir E. Arnold rendered it The Song Celestial when he transposed it into English verse.
4. The Dasehra covers the first ten days of the waxing moon in late September or early October. The diwali night is the dark night following about nineteen days later.
5. About a tenth of the text is found in the Mahabharata.

NOTES TO CHAPTER II
1. See S. Radhakrishnan, The Hindu View of Life.
2. See K. M. Panikkar, Hinduism at the Crossroads.
3. The English word is derived from the Portuguese casta meaning race or species. There is no specific Indian word for caste as an institution. The Sanskrit term for a caste is varna which has become in modern Hindustani zat.
4. There is no exact translation of dharma, which includes overtones not implied in the English words.
5. Thus Professor J. H. Hutton calls them "the exterior castes."
6. E. Senart, Les Castes dans l'Inde ( Paris, 1896, etc.).
7. Sir H. Risley, The People of India ( London, 1908, etc.).
8. A. M. Hocart, Caste, a Comparative Study ( 1950).
9. J. H. Hutton, Caste in India ( Cambridge, 1946).
10. E.g., scavenging, tanning, leatherworking.

NOTES TO CHAPTER III
1. Literally, "old writings." They are mainly legendary and marvelous, but may be said to contain hints of historic fact.
2. In the foothills near the modern Rawalpindi, capital of Pakistan.
3. Altogether some thirty "edicts" have been discovered with several miscellaneous inscriptions.
4. Romila Thapar, Asoka and the Decline of the Mauryas (Oxford, 1960).

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